Skip to main content

About this Show


program was likely cut short due to a recording issue




San Francisco, CA, USA

Comcast Cable

Channel 24 (225 MHz)






San Francisco 9, Us 4, Nancycy Pelosi 2, San Franciscans 2, Michelle Obama 1, Bryant 1, Cal 1, San Francisco Unified 1, Presidio 1, Obama 1, Harvey 1, Guadalajara 1, Healthier City 1, Texas 1, Willie Brown 1, The City 1,
Borrow a DVD
of this show
  SFGTV    [untitled]  

    January 29, 2013
    6:00 - 6:27pm PST  

august since the last thirty years. and homicides and gun violence down over the first part of the year citywide. thank you to all our police officers that can thank you pastor bryant and to our faiths leaders. thank you. we need to save young men's lives and we can be safer still. weigh are getting more pollens on your streets. i look forward to sign into law
the by an of hallow points bullets. these bullets have no place on our streets. and there's another type of violent crime where often no weapon is involved and that's domestic violence and abuse which effects whoo too many woman and children in our streets. we must prevent and report domestic abuse. i pledge - and i pledge to continue to working on the pleasantly with our partners in
the community to bring to issue the violation that will prevent woman and children >> i'm also proud that under our probation departments and working with police and other city departments san francisco in 2012 has responded to the challenges a of realignment and intergrating non-violent programs it sport non-violent lives. and just as he must continue to be a healthier city. less than one year our adults
will receive health care thanks to president obama and nancycy pelosi. we have a long-standing healthy program and the new international law will extend the program to 3 b thousand san franciscans. and just as we must keep getting health care and pension reform define we must address the challenge of the unfunded liability area.
we're beginning to make progress but we must development a more responsible approach to providing health care to our retired city employees >> and know that together our partners in labor will address this the san francisco way to son sense once in a while. and finally, we must rebuilt our st. louis hospital in the mission. they're the priors of critical health deliver as well as major employers. members of the board have taken a strong leadership role working with my office to bring a proposal back to the community
that delivers jobs and most importantly critical health care for our city were we're going to get it done. and that brings me arrest warrant why we're here today. a college track and education. i hear from businesses that they're number one priority is education. they would like nothing better to hire san franciscans but they often struggle to find their candidates. and it's clear to me the only way our city will continue to be strong is if we support the improvement of our city schools. in many cities they choose to
address the keegs challenges by picking fights and appointing fingers but once again not in 90 san francisco. together we strive for excellence in our public schools not excused. last year, i met with our community leaders the first time in our memories the mayor and others and we all agree that technology, expediting our kids earlier with the expectation for college and seth them to in our economies is the keys key to success and we're making progress. san francisco unified continues
to be the hive urban development are high. we've seen double digit high-grades among our latin and africa kids >> results are being recognized for our achievement we received a federal grab the to bring job training in our mission neighborhood. the supervisor knows about this.
these gains are possible because reforms are underway the partnership are in place. for our kids to succeed in this economy we must do more. that's why this year i will propose in my budgeted more resources more than $50,000,000,000 and $25 million for preschool activities. i view education as an be investment not an expense. the folk in the road for many kids and many families the point
at which they decide they're though stay in san francisco or leave. you're going to hear me talking about this layoff a lot this year. i want our middle squirrels to courthousess choose the road to success notes the road that leads to trouble or and is the one of the 3 san franciscans who went there know we must continue to preserve our colleges decree - it's important to equip our kids to win in the 20th century
you knew. i've offered the schools leadership to continue to go forward. i want to thank you you for working with the state to put city college back on track and r that keeps the opportunity coming for every san franciscan young person. because hope and opportunity after all are at the heart of the this place the idea we call san francisco. you know, many of us came here from smoip else or their parents did. and whether it was guadalajara
or a rural county in texas what brought us here was that hope where in san francisco as most places offered a better life. it was judged by a play we create not by a language we grew up with. we're a city that rewards the inno matter and the risktaker. fred and harvey ye very and willie brown and nancycy pelosi. we've known our share of adversity, earthquake and the problems with aids.
we're not afraid to fail or doing what we know is right. and most importantly we know that none of us succeed alone whether it's in reconcile or business or life. we know as michelle obama said so well, this past summer when you walk through that door of opportunity you don't slam it shut you help someone else walk through that door behind you. my fellow san franciscans i know there's no limit to the opportunities in this city in we keep the door open. if we commit ourselves and put politics behind us we can help
future generations and thank you go because we have a great waste water system here in san francisco, we do about 80 million gallons of waste water here in san francisco, which means we basically fill up 120 olympic sized swimming pools each and every day here in the
city. we protect public health and safety and environment because we are discharging into the bay and into the ocean. this is essentially the first treatment here at our waste water treatment facility. what we do is slow down the water so that things either settle to the bottom or float to the top. you see we have a nice selection of things floating around there, things from bubble gum wrappers, toilet paper, whatever you dump down the toilet, whatever gets into our storm drains, that's what gets into our waste water treatment and we have to clean. >> see these chains here, this keeps scum from building up. >> on this end in the liquid end basically we're just trying to produce a good water product that doesn't negatively impact the receiving water so that we
have recreation and no bad impact on fish and aquatic life. solids is what's happening. . >> by sludge, what exactly do you mean? is that the actual technical term? . >> it's a technical term and it's used in a lot of different ways, but this is organic sewage sludge. basically what it is is, oh, maybe things that come out of your garbage disposal, things that are fecal in nature. it's sludge left in the water after the primary treatment, then we blend those two over and send them over to digestion. this building is built to replace tanks here that were so odoriferous they would curl your hair. we built this as an interim
process. >> is there a coagulant introduced somewhere in the middle of this? . >> this coagulant brings solids together and lets the water run through. that gives us more time in the digestion process, more time to reduce the amount of solids. these are the biggest ones in the world, like we always like to do in san francisco. they are 4 meter, there's none like it in the world. >> really? wow. >> three meters, usually. we got the biggest, if not the best. so here we are. look at that baby hum. river of sludge. >> one of the things is we use bacteria that's common in our own guts to create this reduction. it's like an extra digestion. one of the things we have to do to facilitate that is heat that sludge up and keep it at the
temperature our body likes, 98.6 degrees. >> so what we have here is the heat exchanger for digester no. 6. these clog up with debris and we're coming in to -- next wet weather season so we always come through here, clean them out, make sure that we get maximum heat exchange during the colder wet weather. sludge season. >> rubber glove. >> right here. >> rubber glove, excellent. all right, guys. >> thank you. >> good luck. >> this is the full on hazmat. . >> residual liquid. we're taking it time to let it drain. we don't want to get sludge on it necessarily. take your time. stand on the side of it.
. >> should we let it release for a while? . >> let it release. >> is that the technical term? . >> this is the most important bolt on the whole thing. this is the locking bolt. it locks this thing right in place. so now. >> take your hammer and what we want to do, we get rag build up right in here. the hot water recirculates right in here, the sludge recirculates in here. the sludge sometimes has rags in it. all we want to do is go around the clean the rags. let me show you how. take the slide hammer, go all the way through the back, go around. >> got you. >> during the real rainy
season, how does that change the way dealing with this job? is it a lot more stuff in there? . >> what we do, charles, we do this quarterly. every four months we go around and clean all the heat exchangers so we don't have a large build up. . >> go around? . >> yeah. (sound of hammering). >> what i'm trying to do, charles, is always pull it out on the low stroke. >> right. so you are not, like, flying out. now talk about clean up.
. >> then where does this stuff get deposited? . >> we're going to dump it in a debris box and it will go back to the plant. >> if you think back, the romans came up with a system of plumbing that allowed us it use water to transport waste away from the hub of civilization, which enabled cities to grow. . >> you have a large bowl, a drive motor and another motor with a planetary gearbox with differential pressure inside there. the large mass up there spinning separating the solids from the liquid. we have to prevent about once a month, we go in there grease those, change the oil, check the vibration levels.
the operators can tell just by the hum of that machine that it's a harmonic noise emitted that it's out of balance and the machine needs to be cleaned. it will start vibrating and we have vibration analysis machines that will come over here and check the levels. so it's kind of an on-going thing that you have to stay on top of on a daily basis. >> handled properly, you take organic residuals, as we call them, that are leftovers of our society and turn them back into some energy. and we have another ability to take that sludge and get a nutrient value for crops there. we actually are running a kind of composting energy recovery system. >> well, this is a dirty job. we try to do it safely and we try to do it without imposing too much on the public. people want to flush their
toilets and have things go away and not be bothersome again. we do a lot to try to accomplish that. i'd like to invite you to come back any time you want. once you got this in your blood, you are not going to be able to stay away. the raging waters are fun and when we do digester cleaning i really hope you can come back. that's quite a sight. >> yeah, that sounds interesting. >> i really appreciate you coming by and it was a >> in this fabulously beautiful persidio national park and near golden gate and running like a scar is this ugly highway. that was built in 1936 at the
same time as the bridge and at that time the presidio was an army and they didn't want civilians on their turf. and the road was built high. >> we need access and you have a 70 year-old facility that's inadequate for today's transportation needs. and in addition to that, you have the problem that it wasn't for site extenders. >> the rating for the high viaduct is a higher rating than that collapsed. and it was sapped quite a while before used and it was rusty before installed.
>> a state highway through a federal national park connecting an independently managed bridge to city streets. this is a prescription for complication. >> it became clear unless there was one catalyst organization that took it on as a challenge, it wouldn't happen and we did that and for people to advocate. and the project has a structural rating of 2 out of 100. >> you can see the rusting reinforcing in the concrete when you look at the edges now. the deck has steel reinforcing that's corroded and lost 2/3's of its strength. >> this was accelerated in 1989
when the earthquake hit and cal came in and strengthened but can't bring to standards. to fix this road will cost more than to replace. and for the last 18 years, we have been working on a design to replace the road way, but to do in a way that makes it appropriate to be in a national park and not army post. >> i would say it's one of the most ugly structure, and it's a barrier between the mar sh and presidio. and this is a place and i brought my dogs and
grandchildren and had a picnic lunch and it was memorable to use them when we come here. what would it look like when the design and development is completed. and we are not sure we want an eight lane highway going through this town. and it's a beautiful area in a national seaport area on the planet. >> the road is going to be so different. it's really a park way, and it's a parkway through the national park. and they make the road disapeer to the national park. >> and the road is about 20 feet lower, normally midday, you go through it in two minutes. looking back from the golden